Kizashi Club

Your Kizashi Owners Club and Forum 

The Do It Yourself section is used provide assistance with mods and fixes. Whenever you are making a change to your car please take pictures and notes. Let others know what to watch out for and any useful tricks you learn. If you are starting a post in this section from scratch please hold it to a higher standard than you would for other forum posts. i.e. technical detail and even grammar.
Please post about issues or problems in the Technical Support & Problem Troubleshooting forum.
 #47743  by Ronzuki
 Wed Sep 12, 2018 12:56 pm
bdleonard wrote:I have not, but the filter cross references to the Jeep / Dodge / Mitsubishi / Nissan / Suzuki vehicles that use our CVT. Some dodge and Nissan owners have actually used the Mitsubishi supplied o-ring, and Dodge and Nissan don't appear to offer it as a discrete part either. Example, from a person with a 2010 Altima 2.5 which uses the same CVT: https://www.nissanclub.com/forums/2007- ... -mesh.html


And this is the problem we have until someone actually obtains parts for our Suzuki Jatco JF011E CVTs and actually replaces them (from the link above):

Update 1: The Cooler Filter, 31726-3JX0A, the dealership provided is the wrong. I "think" the correct filter part is 31726-1XF00. The Cooler Housing O-Ring is also wrong. See attached pic. Its Sunday and dealership is closed, cant get correct parts today.

One of the untold number of "I got the parts and they didn't fit" posts/articles/complaints I've read recently regarding Jatco CVT gasket/filters. It is extremely important to note that while the same 'basic model JF011E' is used by many auto manufacturers in many different vehicles around the globe, vehicle specific interface parts such as this cooler for instance, can have variations from one brand and sub model to another. This is not at all uncommon in manufacturing. There are in fact two very different JATCO CVTs assemblies used in 3 short years of Suzuki Kizashi production requiring 2 very different pan gaskets and pan filters. Yet they are both Jatco JF011E CVTs. When speaking of crossable parts, we should all try to be diligent to add specific make, model and YEAR info to any posts when discussing topics such as this. Helps to weed out the plethora of internet mis-information.

On to the results....Long story, but I ended up driving to work and back Monday and Tuesday w/ the Kiz (uneventfully) before actually checking level last night. Checked the stick, and it was just above the full cold mark. Ooops, probably not great that I put over 100 miles on it, but, it was quiet and I was taking it easy on purpose. So I added the last 1/2 quart I had after an absolute hammering I delivered to the thing on a hilly set of twisties just before arriving home (no funny noises or issues during that flogging). Temps outside are/were only in the high 60s low 70s with all this lousy weather. That brought it up to around the level where the TSB shows on the stick. Fired it up and did the PRNDNRP dance a couple times to mix things up and called it a night. Stick read about full hot. Good enough...and, it's all the fluid I had left anyway.

This morning before leaving I checked it and the level had lowered to somewhere around the full cold mark again. It appears that something I'd read in one of the many Jatco CVT 'diag' articles seems to hold true (mind you, I never rebuilt an auto trans so they're black-boxes to me)...if it is not fully warmed up, certain valves/passages/portals do not fully 'open' up allowing air to remain in those passages and not be displaced by fluid, altering the level we read on the stick at varying temperatures. Remember, I did this drain/ fill service cold. The quick spin around the block I'd done after the first drain/fill was to simply mix the old and new fluid thoroughly before the second drain. It did not warm anything up hardly at all. Back to having the damn thing within a specific temp range just to check level conundrum. So, I'm going with the "I drove it hard like I stole it and was being chased, wound it up to high R's, so, it's freaking hot" mentality.

The good news is I'm very pleased with how it ran and sounded this morning on the way to work. Solid. It's smoother in Auto mode and snappier on the paddles and....quieter! Dare I say it's not even tacking as high as it had been doing 80mph on the highway? I feel this to be true. My next fill-up and fuel economy check may indicate that it is as well. I will be looking to obtain the correct cooler filter parts between now and the next drain/fill service I plan on in another 15k or so. Sooner if it starts whining again. It's at about 81k now.

For all of you who are over 30k and haven't done this...do it. Especially if you hear whining. With the exception of getting the level set correctly, it's easier than changing your engine oil really. More expensive unfortunately. The CVT is the weakest link in our cars, in my opinion, so taking better care of it is imperative. Your trans, and ultimately your check-book, will thank you.
 #47747  by bdleonard
 Wed Sep 12, 2018 3:39 pm
There is a reason I said that Nissan doesn't list the part, and gave the Mitsubishi part numbers. There is more information there than in the top post. The list price for the O-ring is under $5, you can just have your local Mistubishi dealer order you one. http://mitsubishiautomotiveparts.com/oe ... 0A096.html

Folks with Nissans, Dodges, and Mitsubishi with our CVT / cooler setup have used the Mitsubishi O-ring (and filter, though that can be found aftermarket). Suzuki does not sell it, Nissan does not sell it, Dodge does not sell it. The Mitsubishi part is the only choice, and if it is wrong, there is likely no "right" part you can buy on its own.
 #47751  by Ronzuki
 Wed Sep 12, 2018 10:17 pm
That's just it...becomes a hope and poke situation because it's not listed anywhere specifically for our vehicles. All I was trying to convey above is even those that are advertised for specific make/model still are in hope-n-poke situations when they go to change it the first time. I'm not willing to crack open my cooler/filter cover unless I have a known good part in my hands, by/from whoever, when I do it. That, or a whole pile of possibles that I can select one from that'll seal it back up again.
Last edited by Ronzuki on Sun Oct 07, 2018 12:55 am, edited 1 time in total.
 #47777  by KansasKid
 Sat Sep 15, 2018 10:34 pm
Just out of curiosity, anyone have any thoughts about how to do a transmission flush instead of wasting 3-6 qts of transmission fluid, and if that's even a good idea?

If I was going to change the CVT fluid in Azumi, I'd just follow Ronzuki's procedure. But, I'd like to not waste any transmission oil if at all possible. Azumi is almost at 50K miles, and isn't having any transmission whining yet. I'm not sure if I should try to cange the fluid to be safe, or just leave it be. It seems like the owners manual says to just check the CVT fluid every once in a while, but doesn't explicitly state ANY interval at which to actually change the fluid.
 #47781  by bdleonard
 Sun Sep 16, 2018 3:14 am
KansasKid wrote:Just out of curiosity, anyone have any thoughts about how to do a transmission flush instead of wasting 3-6 qts of transmission fluid, and if that's even a good idea?

If I was going to change the CVT fluid in Azumi, I'd just follow Ronzuki's procedure. But, I'd like to not waste any transmission oil if at all possible. Azumi is almost at 50K miles, and isn't having any transmission whining yet. I'm not sure if I should try to cange the fluid to be safe, or just leave it be. It seems like the owners manual says to just check the CVT fluid every once in a while, but doesn't explicitly state ANY interval at which to actually change the fluid.


You can do a "cooler line" flush where you disconnect the return line from the transmission cooler, and pump it into a bucket while you add new fluid up top. Generally, you'd start by draining and filling the pan first. However, if everything does not go according to plan you run a much higher risk of damaging the transmission. While the consecutive pan changes waste some fluid, it is a much safer course of action.
 #47783  by bdleonard
 Sun Sep 16, 2018 3:34 am
Ronzuki wrote:That just it...becomes a hope and poke situation because it's not listed anywhere specifically for our vehicles. All I was trying to convey above is even those that are advertised for specific make/model still are in hope-n-poke situations when they go to change it the first time. I'm not willing to crack open my cooler/filter cover unless I have a known good part in my hands, by/from whoever, when I do it. That, or a whole pile of possibles that I can select one from that'll seal it back up again.


If you don't want to do it until someone else has verified the fitment, I understand. I have done the research, the only reason I cannot confirm empirically is that by my schedule the car isn't due to have the cooler off an the filter changed for another 15k miles (I've only got 35k on the car).

We have the slim plate, other vehicles have the "beehive" . Everything I can find indicates the O-ring is the same and Mitsubishi is the only OEM that sells it as an individual part. In 2 years when I hit 50K, I'll be able to tell you definitively. Until then, all I can say is that all evidence from cross referencing several OEM part diagrams (from several JATCO JF011E users) indicates that it is the right part, and nobody else currently sells any possible listed alternative. I can say that when I pull my cooler apart in 2 years for a filter change, for $5 I will have one on hand.
 #47784  by SamirD
 Sun Sep 16, 2018 3:46 am
Thank you for all the research and I look forward to your findings on the o-ring. 8-)
 #47799  by Ronzuki
 Mon Sep 17, 2018 12:42 am
At 50k and if you don't drive it terribly hard, it's very likey the original o-ring will still be good enough to seal it back up if you don't damage it. At 80k and the heat mine has seen over the years, my experience is my current o-ring has a high probability of not holding tight once removed. I loath leaks of any kind.

As far as flushing our CVT's is concerned, I've read in that AMMCO service guide I posted a link to elsewhere that that cooler return filter is the precise reason why we can't power flush the CVT. Why I'm not sure, but it was mentioned in that document. I'm thinking AMMCO knows a little more about the things than I do. Also, many years ago I'd contacted Suzuki ASMC directly about flushing the CVT and, at that time, they said the trans didn't need any service of that type and they had no recommendation.

I am a huge fan of flushing, but I wouldn't do a flush to our CVTs because of the filter...Ammco's statement makes sense to me, forcing fluid through a pleated filter element could potentially rupture it causing untold harm. I had flushed our suburban 2 or 3 times and our 08 SX4's conventional AT at 50k with no problems.
 #47819  by bdleonard
 Wed Sep 19, 2018 1:25 am
I want to be clear the the "cooler line flush" I'm suggesting involves no machine and can be done on any automatic with a transmission cooler. Basic procedure: Drain pan, over fill pan by a couple of quarts, remove cooler return line and place it in to empty marked bucket, Idle engine (leave the transmission in park!) until the overfilled amount is in bucket, shut off engine, over fill with a couple more quarts, repeat until fluid coming out looks / smells like fresh from the bottle, reattach cooler line, set final fluid level.

This has the advantage of both not wasting fluid, and ending up with nearly 100% new fluid in the system (a bit will mix inside the transmission). The down side is that, if you screw up, you can make one heck of a mess and/or damage the transmission if you accidentally run it low on fluid. If you attempt it, I'd suggest having a second person to start and stop the engine. If you're not confident that you know what you are doing with that procedure, spending a bit more on an extra drain and fill or two is a much safer path.
 #47820  by Ronzuki
 Wed Sep 19, 2018 1:54 am
Thanks for the clarification. That should work, but as you say, need to be cautious of running the sump dry. I use that same method on power steering fluid swaps. Advantage there is you can see what's in the reservoir and pour faster and/or shut the engine off if it runs too low and threatens to suck air.. 2 person operation for sure.