Kizashi Club

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Ask technical questions or post on problems/issues related to the Kizashi under this topic. Symptoms and pictures of your problem are a good idea.
NOTE: Any car related technical question can be posted here.
 #48760  by Yanfuwah
 Sun Jan 27, 2019 4:26 pm
Thanks for the comments and the support on this thread, I followed the advice and bypassed the steering lock, which proved it was the steering lock issue. That at least enabled me to get the dealer to offer something as part exchange whereas last week he wouldn't offer me anything.

If I didn't work out of town every week, I would have persevered with the car, but I just don't have the time to spend on the repairs. I had intended for my daughter to learn to drive in the car, and expected to have it for another 5 years because of the very low km's on the clock (71,000 k), I was even intending giving it to her when she heads off to University in a few years.

Ultimately, I was sad to see the car go yesterday, but all I need is a car that will run when I need it to, which is Friday evenings to Monday mornings every week and if there's a problem, a knowledgeable outlet to repair the car under warranty, which I now have.

Thank you again for the help.
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 #48762  by Ronzuki
 Mon Jan 28, 2019 2:03 pm
KuroNekko wrote: I think it should be more with the lack of competent mechanics rather than the car.


The unnecessary crap in the car is the issue, so yeah, it's the car. Regardless, this 'lack of competency' issue isn't going to magically lessen moving forward by any stretch. And mechanics are just that...MECHANICS. They are not electrical technicians, electricians, IT gurus nor automation engineers. The automotive biz needs to accept the fact that the guy doing brake jobs, oil changes and water pumps is no where near the the same level of individual with an aptitude for critical problem solving of that which he physically can't touch or see. Different guy, different pay scale. Guess what? When they do figure it out and begin to implement the solution, be ready for your hourly repair rates to double. And I'm not just referring to autos either as this 4th industrial revolution spirals out of control. Hence why the OP just bailed on the car. Too great a risk for an incompetent repair. However, one can only afford the buy new everything, throw it all away when it fails in short order, and buy more new cycle for so long. In fact, the lack of competency issue will become exponentially worse (and rather quickly) as newer models of 'stuff', such as my Mazda, with all its annoying techno-wizardry being forced upon the consumer, begins to age... and fail. "Age" being are relatively short time span mind you. As an example, I absolutely abhor that G**D**n auto braking BS. The only thing I can't completely disable. I drive how I drive and the frigging car needs to understand that there are buggies on the roads all around here doing random chit all the time. You fly by them and move on otherwise you'll never get where you're going and you might as well walk. The old automation and repeatability thing again...buggies are non-repeatable nor predictable items. So what does the car's feeble automation do? Slams on the damn brakes for no good reason nearly causing rear-enders. I'm sure it actually has caused rear-enders in fact, just not me...yet..

This CX5 is the first new car I'd ever purchased an extended warranty on...ever. Trusting that Mazda, if no one else, can solve their own ridiculously expensive gremlin issues should they arise. If that doesn't pan out during this ownership period, well then leasing is the next and final approach, which I've never done either. (I don't have too many more new car purchase cycles left in me fortunately/unfortunately). Select vehicle, drive it 2-3 years, unload it before it needs anything, repeat. Next guy's problem. Economically, that'll have some dire repercussions I'm certain.
 #48774  by KuroNekko
 Wed Jan 30, 2019 4:05 am
Ronzuki wrote:The unnecessary crap in the car is the issue, so yeah, it's the car. Regardless, this 'lack of competency' issue isn't going to magically lessen moving forward by any stretch. And mechanics are just that...MECHANICS. They are not electrical technicians, electricians, IT gurus nor automation engineers. The automotive biz needs to accept the fact that the guy doing brake jobs, oil changes and water pumps is no where near the the same level of individual with an aptitude for critical problem solving of that which he physically can't touch or see. Different guy, different pay scale. Guess what? When they do figure it out and begin to implement the solution, be ready for your hourly repair rates to double. And I'm not just referring to autos either as this 4th industrial revolution spirals out of control. Hence why the OP just bailed on the car. Too great a risk for an incompetent repair. However, one can only afford the buy new everything, throw it all away when it fails in short order, and buy more new cycle for so long. In fact, the lack of competency issue will become exponentially worse (and rather quickly) as newer models of 'stuff', such as my Mazda, with all its annoying techno-wizardry being forced upon the consumer, begins to age... and fail. "Age" being are relatively short time span mind you. As an example, I absolutely abhor that G**D**n auto braking BS. The only thing I can't completely disable. I drive how I drive and the frigging car needs to understand that there are buggies on the roads all around here doing random chit all the time. You fly by them and move on otherwise you'll never get where you're going and you might as well walk. The old automation and repeatability thing again...buggies are non-repeatable nor predictable items. So what does the car's feeble automation do? Slams on the damn brakes for no good reason nearly causing rear-enders. I'm sure it actually has caused rear-enders in fact, just not me...yet..

This CX5 is the first new car I'd ever purchased an extended warranty on...ever. Trusting that Mazda, if no one else, can solve their own ridiculously expensive gremlin issues should they arise. If that doesn't pan out during this ownership period, well then leasing is the next and final approach, which I've never done either. (I don't have too many more new car purchase cycles left in me fortunately/unfortunately). Select vehicle, drive it 2-3 years, unload it before it needs anything, repeat. Next guy's problem. Economically, that'll have some dire repercussions I'm certain.


I disagree with your first sentence. After all, ALL CARS have these components. Steering wheel locks were implemented to reduce vehicle theft and have made a huge impact in that. Hence, every vehicle today has one and they've been around for decades in a mechanical form. Personally, I've had more issues with my old mechanical steering wheel lock in a previous car than with the Kizashi's electronic one. Keep in mind again that the issue here isn't the technology but the fact that Suzuki used a faulty one. Hence, this issue is prevalent with Suzuki, Nissan, and Infinitis that used the same part supplier. And again, given it's a lubrication issue more than a fundamental design flaw, it's haphazard and not everyone may experience it. Ambient temperatures will also play a factor. This is likely why some people experience this issue often while others like me have never once had it act up. At least yet.

As for the automated braking, I'd agree with you. It's not necessary and I'm quite shocked that you can't turn it off. Maybe there is a way via the OBDII port. I think for most drivers in most conditions, it's useful but there are exceptions and you are one. Most people can't relate to driving in rural Pennsylvania where the Amish in their buggies are those you share the road with. For these exceptions, one should be able to turn it off. Have you checked through the CX-5 forums? I'm sure the matter has been investigated by some.
 #48776  by Vitra
 Wed Jan 30, 2019 8:56 pm
I have same issue for my kizashi starting last year in Spring after changing new battery. I called the dealer today n explain my problem. He immediately knew what happen because he got few cars fixed to replace the lock for last 6 months. He mentioned that the y may happen few times per day, no problem for few months n back again. Also, he mentioned that if doing short trip all the time n will happen to wheel lock sensor .


When changing the wheel lock n recommend to.do re program for key FOB. To make sure everything work. This jobs to take 3 hours labour cost n part for USD$320.00
 #48783  by Woodie
 Thu Jan 31, 2019 11:27 am
That's how a competent service writer or mechanic will react. At this point it should be no surprise or mystery to anyone who services Suzuki's.

It has NOTHING to do with your battery or your keyfob, it's a mechanical failure inside the lock module.
 #48784  by Ronzuki
 Thu Jan 31, 2019 8:42 pm
KuroNekko wrote:I disagree with your first sentence. After all, ALL CARS have these components. Steering wheel locks were implemented to reduce vehicle theft and have made a huge impact in that. Hence, every vehicle today has one and they've been around for decades in a mechanical form. Personally, I've had more issues with my old mechanical steering wheel lock in a previous car than with the Kizashi's electronic one. Keep in mind again that the issue here isn't the technology but the fact that Suzuki used a faulty one. Hence, this issue is prevalent with Suzuki, Nissan, and Infinitis that used the same part supplier. And again, given it's a lubrication issue more than a fundamental design flaw, it's haphazard and not everyone may experience it. Ambient temperatures will also play a factor. This is likely why some people experience this issue often while others like me have never once had it act up. At least yet.

As for the automated braking, I'd agree with you. It's not necessary and I'm quite shocked that you can't turn it off. Maybe there is a way via the OBDII port. I think for most drivers in most conditions, it's useful but there are exceptions and you are one. Most people can't relate to driving in rural Pennsylvania where the Amish in their buggies are those you share the road with. For these exceptions, one should be able to turn it off. Have you checked through the CX-5 forums? I'm sure the matter has been investigated by some.


Wrong..mechanical column locks have been around forever, not electrically operated by BS software/firmware dependent black box keyless ignition system locks. And, ask the guy who can't start his car whether he gives a rat's-butt if Nissan and Infinity have the known problem. Applying too much technology to things IS the issue and problem, be it faulty or not. Because ultimately, the technology fails and we'll be experiencing the negative and overly expensive results as we are beginning to see.

Alas, mother nature has provided a way to turn off the braking system by caking icy slush all over the car's front end, which includes the PITA radar detector located directly behind the Mazda emblem. Therefore, as predicted, autonomous vehicles once again are proving to be an expensive pipe-dream and have no place on the American roads of the Northeast... at a bare minimum. On the way home in the snow the forward camera error came up almost immediately, frost on the windshield (happens alot) disabling the cruise control (below 20mph it claims) and the auto high-beams. Lane keep assist would also be disabled because of poor fwd camera can't see. However I get no warning info for that one since I have that lazy-man's system completely disabled. Even if not disabled by me, it would still be disabled not only because the camera wasn't able to see period, but the fact there are no lines to follow on an ice covered road. Then ,about halfway home, a new one...the forward facing radar disabled warning popped up for the first time, which, fully kills the braking the annoying braking (yeah, I tested it) and renders my Radar Adaptive Cruise Control completely useless. Sooo, take off front bumper cover and pack the back side of the Mazda emblem w/ play-doh, silly putty, bubble gum, plumber's putty, or the like, and that should do just fine, except I like cruise control. Sucks taking that cover off as well, I did it to install the fog lights. The Kizashi's is far easier. So all this whizz-bang techno crap that I paid too much for simply to get a 'good' stereo in the car is all but useless under real-world adverse conditions Remember...I've said it many times, automation requires repeatability. If you intend on automating something, it is imperative to deal with the exceptions, that is not an excuse. If you're going to automate something, then do it right and make it work, lest we have half-assed automation that people despise. The radar in the Mazda can be set to very low sensitivity, which tain't low enough. It can not be completely turned off via any Mazda operator controls as the lane keep assist crap can. Next time I'm at the Mazda dealer I'm going to inquire if they can disable it. I'm not voiding my regular or extended warranties by performing any hack jobs either so there's no need to search CX5 forums. Besides, after reading a couple of those sites, I'd stand a better chance of gaining a useful answer from the folks on this forum anyway.

So tell me, the masses that become accustom to the car doing what they should be doing, driving, braking, etc....how, exactly are they going to react when, despite a lawyerly approved warning that pops up on a dashboard or screen, the car doesn't stop on its own before rear ending someone or some thing (akaTesla)? Because we all know how everyone pays attention to warning lights and all....
 #50339  by sschriber
 Thu Aug 22, 2019 2:17 am
Steering lock issue was starting show up on warm dry days so after at least 100 routines of step out - lock and unlock then get back in, I decided to get the lock module replaced. The dealer price had come down to $272 and I was quoted 2 hrs labor. When I ordered the part I asked if they had done many of these; the service guy said a couple of dozen or so...cool. The part came in and I sent up the repair which came off without a hitch for a cost of less than $500. Curiously as I was leaving, my service guy mentioned that they were doing another that afternoon. Seems to me the remaining Suzuki authorized repair network are well aware of this steering lock issue.

The new unit is much more quiet than the old which had a definite actuator whine and click when disengaging the lock.