Kizashi Club

Your Kizashi Owners Club and Forum 

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 #51453  by Knightstruth
 Tue Apr 28, 2020 4:53 pm
KlutzNinja wrote:Electric cars suffer a gradual loss in battery range over time, especially if the owner uses fast-charging frequently, which is hard on the battery. But otherwise electric cars appear to be more reliable overall than internal-combustion engines. A lot of the things that go wrong to cause a certain car to be deemed “unreliable” often has to do with the engine or transmission, and electric cars have neither. Batteries and motors are much simpler to maintain over time, as there are far fewer moving parts involved. Their “transmissions” seem to be simpler than conventional transmissions as well. Some of this simplicity also applies to hybrids and plug-in hybrids. Not sure about hydrogen fuel cell vehicles like the Mirai, however; those are basically electric vehicles powered by hydrogen, but I’d imagine similar reliability.

The switch to electric from gasoline will happen at different rates in different places. I think I read Holland has set a ban on the sale of gasoline-powered vehicles by 2025, which is a lot sooner than most other places. The entirety of Volvo’s lineup will be electrified to some extent in the near future. Meanwhile Toyota has taken their sweet time developing fully electric cars, but they have so many hybrids that they don’t really need to, as far as the Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards go.

With such a stigma around EVs in America, not to mention a strong sense of nostalgia and heritage towards gasoline cars, I’d imagine the transition here in the States will take so long we’ll probably be fighting North Korea or something for last place lol. As good as EVs are getting, and as popular as Tesla is, EV sales are like 1.2% of all auto sales in the US. Not sure what the total is if hybrids, PHEVs, and Hydrogen vehicles are included, too. The obsession with buying American trucks will also prevent a full transition for us into full-EV, as they are some of the best selling vehicles in here. Unless the Big 3 go electric, and only electric, which you can bet most truck owners will fight and complain about lol, a fully electric US is a pipe dream, sadly.

Sorry for the ramble. :oops:



Many of the things you say are on point. I am into EVs and keep up to date with the latest news on them. The problem with the US is that many manufacturers will not bring their electric cars over to the states because Americans obsession with SUVs. Right now there just isn't enough choices in EVs in the US to attract enough people.

I got a model 3 because it was one of the few EVs that compete in its group against BMW 3 series, Audi A4, and others.
Tesla has done well because it offers competitive EVs with a high list of standard features that the competitors make you pay more for. Tesla is still not enough though as they are still charging premium prices, and right now the used EVs have too short of range.

When EVs become price competitive with their gas counterparts, then will the market change. Other countries are way ahead in EVs then the US. EVs will take over though, just too many benefits versus ICE vehicles. Some nice models out there too.
 #51454  by KlutzNinja
 Tue Apr 28, 2020 7:57 pm
Knightstruth wrote:Many of the things you say are on point. I am into EVs and keep up to date with the latest news on them. The problem with the US is that many manufacturers will not bring their electric cars over to the states because Americans obsession with SUVs. Right now there just isn't enough choices in EVs in the US to attract enough people.

I got a model 3 because it was one of the few EVs that compete in its group against BMW 3 series, Audi A4, and others.
Tesla has done well because it offers competitive EVs with a high list of standard features that the competitors make you pay more for. Tesla is still not enough though as they are still charging premium prices, and right now the used EVs have too short of range.

When EVs become price competitive with their gas counterparts, then will the market change. Other countries are way ahead in EVs then the US. EVs will take over though, just too many benefits versus ICE vehicles. Some nice models out there too.


I think another major factor is lack of charging infrastructure at the moment. This is being improved constantly, but I’m not sure at what point it will be deemed sufficient. Urban areas are getting pretty good about providing sufficient charge ports for EVs, but what about rural areas? Lots of the US is rural. Tesla had the foresight to establish a network of chargers across the US to allow for relatively straightforward coast-to-coast trips, but it seems the other charging companies aren’t as focused.
I’m curious as to how the rest of the world fares in this regard.

The American obsession with SUVs and crossovers is another obstacle, I agree, but it’s probably easier to make crossover EVs than EV trucks. There are already a few and likely many more on the way that have yet to be unveiled. BMW has an upcoming electric X3 that was just leaked, for instance.

The main cost issue in EVs is due to the batteries, which are made of expensive materials. Unless the cost for that goes down, I don’t see overall prices decreasing, unfortunately. It should also be noted that EV sales are as good as they are in the US in part due to the government tax rebates. However since there is a limit for each brand based on sales, this won’t last forever. I think GM recently hit one of the thresholds, so the tax rebate won’t be as great as before. But I think I recall hearing Tesla or someone lowered the prices of their vehicles, or at least a model or two, once they hit the threshold, so that the overall price could be similar. But don’t quote me on that haha.

It’s been said somewhere that once you go EV, you tend not to want to go back to gasoline or the like. I think if more Americans gave EVs a chance, like living with them for a week or so, then the transition to electric might happen a lot faster. My cousin recently got a Model 3 and he’s firmly in that camp. Hell, a few years ago someone I knew from my gym got a measly Smart ForTwo EV and was swayed by that lol. The Smart was one of the worst new cars on the market but he loved how the EV version felt. His other car was a very well-kept and beautiful Saab 9-3 that he eventually sold. His lease on the Smart expired and I’m pretty sure he intended to get another EV.
 #51455  by Knightstruth
 Wed Apr 29, 2020 12:24 am
I think another major factor is lack of charging infrastructure at the moment. This is being improved constantly, but I’m not sure at what point it will be deemed sufficient. Urban areas are getting pretty good about providing sufficient charge ports for EVs, but what about rural areas? Lots of the US is rural. Tesla had the foresight to establish a network of chargers across the US to allow for relatively straightforward coast-to-coast trips, but it seems the other charging companies aren’t as focused.
I’m curious as to how the rest of the world fares in this regard.

The American obsession with SUVs and crossovers is another obstacle, I agree, but it’s probably easier to make crossover EVs than EV trucks. There are already a few and likely many more on the way that have yet to be unveiled. BMW has an upcoming electric X3 that was just leaked, for instance.

The main cost issue in EVs is due to the batteries, which are made of expensive materials. Unless the cost for that goes down, I don’t see overall prices decreasing, unfortunately. It should also be noted that EV sales are as good as they are in the US in part due to the government tax rebates. However since there is a limit for each brand based on sales, this won’t last forever. I think GM recently hit one of the thresholds, so the tax rebate won’t be as great as before. But I think I recall hearing Tesla or someone lowered the prices of their vehicles, or at least a model or two, once they hit the threshold, so that the overall price could be similar. But don’t quote me on that haha.

It’s been said somewhere that once you go EV, you tend not to want to go back to gasoline or the like. I think if more Americans gave EVs a chance, like living with them for a week or so, then the transition to electric might happen a lot faster. My cousin recently got a Model 3 and he’s firmly in that camp. Hell, a few years ago someone I knew from my gym got a measly Smart ForTwo EV and was swayed by that lol. The Smart was one of the worst new cars on the market but he loved how the EV version felt. His other car was a very well-kept and beautiful Saab 9-3 that he eventually sold. His lease on the Smart expired and I’m pretty sure he intended to get another EV.[/quote]

Infrastructure plays a role when it comes to charging but that would be an issue more with those renting or for people who tend to do a lot of driving. Many times people forget unlike gas cars people will tend to charge at work and home. I could trickle charge at work for free (when I was going into work that is).

Battery tech is constantly evolving so there are many in the industry that feel EVs will reach price parity by 2025 with their ICE counterparts.
You are absolutely right that once people try out EVs they become hooked. For me once I got my first Hybrid a loaded 2017 Kia optima, that I wanted a full EV. I love how quiet they are, as well as the instant torque with great efficiency.

The EVs that are coming out like the polestar 2 and many others point to a future that is bright.
 #51457  by KuroNekko
 Wed Apr 29, 2020 6:27 am
The other day, I saw a Tesla Model Y in person. It had paper plates and was the first one I've seen. It's quite nice and a huge improvement in the aesthetics over the bloated Model X. I predict these will sell very well, much like the Model 3 sedan. I've also seen the Porsche Taycan EV and wish they kept the front end a bit more traditional.
 #51458  by Ronzuki
 Wed Apr 29, 2020 11:52 am
While I was never inclined to become a VW owner, I have driven several much older gen Jettas as rentals over the years, and they were very enjoyable. Perhaps there is merit here (don't care about the lack of tech, not why I buy a driver's car, and, I do care about interior appointments since that's where I spend my time with the car...inside the car):

2020 Volkswagen Jetta GLI Review
by the Edmunds Experts
The 2020 Volkswagen Jetta GLI is a high-performance version of the standard Jetta. Unlike some recent GLIs, this new generation, which came out just last year, is a lot more than just a slightly upgraded small sedan. Under the hood, it gets the strong 228-horsepower turbocharged 2.0-liter engine out of a GTI. You can even get it with a manual transmission.
If you opt for the Autobahn trim, it has an adaptive suspension that maximizes both ride comfort and handling. And just to make sure it stands out in a crowd, Volkswagen lowers the GLI 0.6 inch compared to the standard Jetta and gives it a unique grille and lighting. The rest of the car is pretty much the same, which means you get sufficient space for adults, an accommodating trunk, and a smooth ride on the highway.
Unfortunately, there are some notable drawbacks. Competitors such as the Honda Civic Si and Mazda 3 have more refined interiors than the GLI, and they both offer better technology features. The GLI's fuel economy is also below segment averages, even when you compare it to high-performance rivals.
None of those gripes are too serious, though, and with such a limited set of competitors, we recommend taking a close look at the Jetta GLI. At the very least, you'll be happy you took one for a test drive.
 #51459  by Ronzuki
 Wed Apr 29, 2020 11:52 am
While I was never inclined to become a VW owner, I have driven several much older gen Jettas as rentals over the years, and they were very enjoyable. Perhaps there is merit here (don't care about the lack of tech, not why a buy a driver's car, and, I do care about interior appointments since that's where I spend my time with the car...inside the car):

2020 Volkswagen Jetta GLI Review
by the Edmunds Experts
The 2020 Volkswagen Jetta GLI is a high-performance version of the standard Jetta. Unlike some recent GLIs, this new generation, which came out just last year, is a lot more than just a slightly upgraded small sedan. Under the hood, it gets the strong 228-horsepower turbocharged 2.0-liter engine out of a GTI. You can even get it with a manual transmission.
If you opt for the Autobahn trim, it has an adaptive suspension that maximizes both ride comfort and handling. And just to make sure it stands out in a crowd, Volkswagen lowers the GLI 0.6 inch compared to the standard Jetta and gives it a unique grille and lighting. The rest of the car is pretty much the same, which means you get sufficient space for adults, an accommodating trunk, and a smooth ride on the highway.
Unfortunately, there are some notable drawbacks. Competitors such as the Honda Civic Si and Mazda 3 have more refined interiors than the GLI, and they both offer better technology features. The GLI's fuel economy is also below segment averages, even when you compare it to high-performance rivals.
None of those gripes are too serious, though, and with such a limited set of competitors, we recommend taking a close look at the Jetta GLI. At the very least, you'll be happy you took one for a test drive.
 #51611  by rossirob73
 Mon Jun 01, 2020 6:14 pm
Onikarge wrote:I would go for a Kia Stinger, reasons: it is a magnificent flagship made by one non-premium honest and reliable Company (like Suzuki), it is both sportive & comfy, very hard to see and has a great price as well, just like the Kizashi had. It´s much more a GT than a sedan,right, but i think the comparision is close if we refer to the basic idea.

I´m not an expert but I think Subaru made another unlucky flagship car (coupe) with its impressive Alcyone- SVX in the 90´s : another criminally misunderstood great car.

The truth is that having an awesome car, unicorn kind, like one of these, so understimated by most buyers is another reason for satisfaction.
Stinger.. good choice.. they look sharp.

Sent from my SM-J530Y using Tapatalk
 #51622  by WESHOOT2
 Tue Jun 02, 2020 12:31 pm
My replacement thoughts center on AWD capability due to my specific driving weather and geography. I've been dreaming of the WRX Limited (must have push-button start; thanks Kizashi for spoiling keys), or the Cadillac ATS (easy to add CD-playing capability).

The struggle continues........